Researchers Identify Cells Thought to be Responsible for Cervical Cancer

A discrete population of squamocolumnar junction cells implicated in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer

A study just published (ahead of print) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by Herfs, et. al., a U.S. and Singapore team headed by Dr. Christopher P. Crum  from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, claims to have “…uncovered a discrete population of SC junctional cells with unique morphology and gene-expression profile…”.  The authors also suggest that based on their findings, ” [these] junctional cells are the source of cervical cancer.”  The authors theorize that these findings “…uncover a potential target for cervical cancer prevention, provide insight into the risk assessment of cervical lesions, and establish a model for elucidating the pathway to cervical cancer following carcinogenic HPV infection.”

There are additional supplemental materials provided which are accessible for review, along with the abstract. The full text article is available for purchase or through a subscription. The abstract follows here.

Abstract

Infection by carcinogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) results in precancers [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)] and cancers near the ectoendocervical squamocolumnar (SC) junction of the cervix. However, the specific cells targeted by HPV have not been identified and the cellular origin of cervical cancer remains elusive. In this study, we uncovered a discrete population of SC junctional cells with unique morphology and gene-expression profile. We also demonstrated that the selected junctional biomarkers were expressed by a high percentage of high-grade CIN and cervical cancers associated with carcinogenic HPVs but rarely in ectocervical/transformation zone CINs or those associated with noncarcinogenic HPVs. That the original SC junction immunophenotype was not regenerated at new SC junctions following excision, not induced by expression of viral oncoproteins in foreskin keratinocytes, and not seen in HPV-related precursors of the vagina, vulva, and penis further support the notion that junctional cells are the source of cervical cancer. Taken together, our findings suggest that carcinogenic HPV-related CINs and cervical cancers are linked to a small, discrete cell population that localizes to the SC junction of the cervix, expresses a unique gene expression signature, and is not regenerated after excision. The findings in this study uncover a potential target for cervical cancer prevention, provide insight into the risk assessment of cervical lesions, and establish a model for elucidating the pathway to cervical cancer following carcinogenic HPV infection.

About Jana Sullinger

GYN Pathologist and Cytopathologist. Special interest in quality assessment and use of online social media in sharing educational information about cytology and quality.

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